It’s time to break that prejudice towards Vietnam post-production


A screenshot from a TVC completed by DIGIPOST

Director Luong Dinh Dung recently told local media that he sent his highly-anticipated movie “Cha cong con” (Father and Son) to South Korea for post-production. He said most of local directors had their works posted overseas, since post-production technologies in Vietnam are not comparable to other regional countries.

The claim is not new, as similar statements have been reported in local media over the past decade.

But how correct are the claims? Is it true that after more than 10 years, there is not a singular improvement in Vietnam’s post-production technologies at all?

It’s not.

The high-profile movie “Tam Cam: The Untold,” released at the end of August, was praised for its visual effects that were created by Vietnamese artists. Major newspapers such as Thanh Nien and Saigon Giai Phong have reported how Vietnam’s post-production technologies have been on par with regional and even Hollywood standards in recent years.

Vietnam’s young artists even have upped their game and created an animated short film, using the latest 3D Virtual Reality technology.

“These days, how advanced your technologies are no longer matters in post-production,” Andy Ho, executive producer at DIGIPOST, commented on the evolution of post-production. “Anyone who has money to spend on high-end software and other top tools can create standard effects.”

“Post-production is now about professionalism,” he said. “What distinguishes a top post house from average ones is how professional its workflows and personnel are.”

A Ho Chi Minh City-based post house with more than 22 years of experience and a team of international professionals, DIGIPOST, for instance, has provided services for both local and international film studios.

Now, however, due to business reasons, DIGIPOST only makes post-production for feature films selectively, like when its services are meant as a support for young filmmakers, Andy said.

“While feature films demand longer workflows and more complicate technologies, they take post houses longer time to recoup investment, compared to TV commercials,” he said in an explanation why DIGIPOST has focused more on TVCs in recent years.

“When the post-production market grows, DIGIPOST will expand its range. Meanwhile, it will continue to focus on the sector of TVCs where it has proved to be a leader in Vietnam,” Andy said.

DIGIPOST 11th Anniversary – by new Producer Lily Pugh

11 years of Digipost. Who better to reflect on their company than their newest recruit. As a new producer to the company, joining the team in June, the anniversary was the perfect opportunity for me to see my new colleagues compromised.
Although the evening was my very first Digipost soirre I could tell there were some traditions at work: home cooked grub from ‘The Boss’ Allen Seet, colorful custom cocktails and some ambitious drinking games, for the more self destructive among us(no names mentioned.) It was clear the party itself was a tradition in the industry calendar with anecdotes about the 8th or 9th anniversary or occasionally the  2nd or 3rd  circulating in the room. It was also a great turn out for year 11 with many faces engaged in eager catch ups.
Although I couldn’t participate in the talk of Digipost parties past.  There were plenty of animated discussions about the future and how the industries is changing and growing in different ways. It was great to see the industry out, alive and well. While we celebrate our longevity also celebrate the ongoing future of Digipost- to the next 11 years!
Party Video:
Party Photo Album
Written by Lily Pugh.

‘Gecko Post – Inside the Post House’ comic series

This is a comic series produced by Digipost Vietnam on the ‘inner-workings’ of life in a post production facility.  I am sure most who have worked in a post house could relate to the many stories we have.

Do check out our gallery on Facebook:

The Artist behind ‘Gecko Post – Inside the Post House’ comic series.


” I’m Que, the concept girl who draws the comic strip: Gecko Post – Inside the Post house. I’m also a designer and creative of Digipost.

The comic was an assignment that my superior gave me when I was still an intern here. I was so excited about it because I love to draw things that had stories and characters.

My first thought is maybe my boss just wanted to test me to decide whether he should offer me a full-time job (and I am a full-time employee now, so congratulations to me haha), but after all, I had a lot of fun doing the comic.

To me, the comic is not a job, I feel very relax when I make it. It is a combination of small and funny stories, they’re all based on true stories (of whom, when and where are confidential haha). At first I often consulted my boss about ideas for stories, and he was willing to share all the interesting stories he saw or heard in the company.

Gradually, I talked more with my colleagues, listened to their stories at lunch or dinner or any relaxing occasion, and they never guessed that even the smallest thing could become inspiration for my comic strips. Of course later they would realize their stories are used, but I’m a good listener (I guess), so they never stop sharing, they like it too.

The one that I made fun of most is probably our Online Artist. When I started designing the characters, there were 2 of them, both were fun men, so I just combined them, and the result is an “Islamic Italian Virgin” character (according to Rahul =]]). And the way he gave me feedback was also so funny, so I made that into my plots too haha (sorry Rahul). He used to asked me: “You made fun of everyone in this company, so who will make fun of you?” And I just said, “I made fun of myself too!” But he didn’t accept that. He said he would draw a “stick figure” comic himself about me. Well, I’’m very much waiting for it :p

A Short Perspective on Story Telling by Nick Jones


Since the dawning of time, people have been telling each other stories. Stories surround us everyday, from the films and television that we watch, to the books that we read, the photographs that we see and the music that we hear. Even in our day-today lives, we are telling stories when we recall a funny incident with our friends at a bar, or repeating a bit of gossip we’ve heard about so-and-so. Our world is built around stories, they educate our children, terrify our parents and amuse our friends.

It is film, among many other forms, which posits itself as one of the most impactful and accessible ways to tell a story. It is in the editing process where we see a story grow and develop…it’s often said that if production is where the film is conceived, then post-production is where it is born.

In fact, film is a relatively new way to tell a story; it’s only a little over 100 years since the pioneering experiments of Eadweard Muybridge and Thomas Edison at the turn of the 20th century changed the way we tell stories forever. In that time, film, it could be argued, has evolved more rapidly than perhaps any art form in history (if we are to include the advancements in CGI). It has become a complex and sophisticated medium, allowing audiences across the world to see and experience everything from heavenly dreams to maniacal nightmares.

Like never before, creating film has been democratized. Access to editing software is getting more and more easy, cameras are getting cheaper and more people are willing and eager to learn the craft. Today, each day, filmmakers from all over the world, from every social-class, from practically every country, of all abilities and of all ages, share and upload new video content on a unprecendeted scale. Never before has artistic output being so readily shared and available to watch. Never before have there been so many stories accessible to digest.

Nonetheless, many themes of dramatic work, tragedy, comedy and revenge for example, we still see in cinema today. There are several fundamental components about how to construct films with these themes: character arcs, key plot points, character depth etc, and these elements can be studied ad infinitum, from books and by watching films, however, I want to recognise that, aside from these things, film has the awesome power to affect.


I’ve always felt that the strongest stories are the ones that say something, about life, about society. Stories have the ability to make us look inwards, and to discover things about ourselves that we might not have had the chance to otherwise. It can challenge our preconceptions, and give us new perspectives, on both an individual scale and a societal level as well.

As an editor and filmmaker, I try to follow the Free Cinema Manifesto which, in part, states that: “An attitude means a style. A style means an attitude.”In essence, this means that your own attitude to a subject should inform your style and visa versa. Similarly, the The Free Cinema-ists also wrote that “No film can be ‘too personal’” meaning that there is no limit to the amount of “yourself” or your personal experience that you inject into the film. This makes films uniquely personal expressions, and on several degrees connect us in our common “human” experiences of life.


So for me, telling a good story is about putting ‘oneself’ into a film emotionally or psychologically. In addition to this, I think using film’s power to connect to people, it’s a good way to say something unique, to make a critique or to voice an opinion.

So here’s the Free Cinema Manifesto (abridged), as written in 1956 by Lindsay Anderson and Lorenza Mazzetti:

As filmmakers we believe that

No film can be too personal.
The image speaks. Sound amplifies and comments.
Size is irrelevant. Perfection is not an aim.

An attitude means a style. A style means an attitude.

An article by Nick Jones.

Happy Monkey Year!

Digipost wishes everyone a prosperous Monkey year, may it be filled with abundance of laughter and mischief!

Speaking about laughter, here is a fun video from out team outing! Beside working, we do know how to have a good time!