A new workflow at Digipost

There will be some changes this year in how Digipost operates. Instead of passing a project from one station to the next, everyone will be organized into a few small teams to take on a whole project collectively. Senior Editor Nick Jones explains the changes and why they’re good for both Digipost and clients:

As Senior Editor at Digipost, what’s the most important part of your role?nick

My role is to mentor and nurture our young team of talented editors.

In just over a year, we have members of our team working with international brands, agencies and directors and I really enjoy knowing that my team is developing and becoming more and more successful.

Who’s on your team and what are their jobs? (Name & role)

My team consists of Quang, who is a very talented storytelling editor, Laura Knieling who is our brilliant colourist (and occasional editor), Leo who is our star junior editor and mgfx guru and Duc who is also a upcoming junior editor and IT chap.

What do you think the advantage is of changing the workflow at Digipost from “assembly-line” style to small teams that take on a project together?

As the industry has changed and moved away from the traditional ways of doing post, we realise that artists need multiple skillsets so that we can work effectively in a dynamic and fluid environment.

Also, our team spirit is very strong. We have a formidable work ethic and a high standard of workmanship. In essence, a strong creative pride. As we are a small team, our work is representative of us all, so we dead-set on making it the best that we can.

Each of us are constantly developing new areas of skills and abilities, so that as each project comes in we can offer more to our client.

What are you most looking forward to in 2017 at Digipost?

I’m looking forward to taking on more and more projects. We also want to integrate a wider skillset in our team, so eventually we can handle all aspects of post production within one unit.

See Digipost’s 2017 reel and Visual Effects reel here.

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A Short Perspective on Story Telling by Nick Jones

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Since the dawning of time, people have been telling each other stories. Stories surround us everyday, from the films and television that we watch, to the books that we read, the photographs that we see and the music that we hear. Even in our day-today lives, we are telling stories when we recall a funny incident with our friends at a bar, or repeating a bit of gossip we’ve heard about so-and-so. Our world is built around stories, they educate our children, terrify our parents and amuse our friends.

It is film, among many other forms, which posits itself as one of the most impactful and accessible ways to tell a story. It is in the editing process where we see a story grow and develop…it’s often said that if production is where the film is conceived, then post-production is where it is born.

In fact, film is a relatively new way to tell a story; it’s only a little over 100 years since the pioneering experiments of Eadweard Muybridge and Thomas Edison at the turn of the 20th century changed the way we tell stories forever. In that time, film, it could be argued, has evolved more rapidly than perhaps any art form in history (if we are to include the advancements in CGI). It has become a complex and sophisticated medium, allowing audiences across the world to see and experience everything from heavenly dreams to maniacal nightmares.

Like never before, creating film has been democratized. Access to editing software is getting more and more easy, cameras are getting cheaper and more people are willing and eager to learn the craft. Today, each day, filmmakers from all over the world, from every social-class, from practically every country, of all abilities and of all ages, share and upload new video content on a unprecendeted scale. Never before has artistic output being so readily shared and available to watch. Never before have there been so many stories accessible to digest.

Nonetheless, many themes of dramatic work, tragedy, comedy and revenge for example, we still see in cinema today. There are several fundamental components about how to construct films with these themes: character arcs, key plot points, character depth etc, and these elements can be studied ad infinitum, from books and by watching films, however, I want to recognise that, aside from these things, film has the awesome power to affect.

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I’ve always felt that the strongest stories are the ones that say something, about life, about society. Stories have the ability to make us look inwards, and to discover things about ourselves that we might not have had the chance to otherwise. It can challenge our preconceptions, and give us new perspectives, on both an individual scale and a societal level as well.

As an editor and filmmaker, I try to follow the Free Cinema Manifesto which, in part, states that: “An attitude means a style. A style means an attitude.”In essence, this means that your own attitude to a subject should inform your style and visa versa. Similarly, the The Free Cinema-ists also wrote that “No film can be ‘too personal’” meaning that there is no limit to the amount of “yourself” or your personal experience that you inject into the film. This makes films uniquely personal expressions, and on several degrees connect us in our common “human” experiences of life.

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So for me, telling a good story is about putting ‘oneself’ into a film emotionally or psychologically. In addition to this, I think using film’s power to connect to people, it’s a good way to say something unique, to make a critique or to voice an opinion.

So here’s the Free Cinema Manifesto (abridged), as written in 1956 by Lindsay Anderson and Lorenza Mazzetti:

As filmmakers we believe that

No film can be too personal.
The image speaks. Sound amplifies and comments.
Size is irrelevant. Perfection is not an aim.

An attitude means a style. A style means an attitude.

An article by Nick Jones.

Building a future with Content.

DIGIPOST Content Development department was launched in early 2015, specializing in web documentary content.

Our Content team is the founder of RICE ( https://www.youtube.com/ricechanneltv ), an online channel featuring original web series by filmmakers in Saigon and other cities in Southeast Asia. Our team is made up of a collective of filmmakers who are given freedom to create content independently.

With the quick growth and success of our channel, our team is embarking into 2016 looking for more filmmakers who want to create content, unrestricted by conventions, and taking on projects that need documentary style content.

We have developed successful web series like ‘You Are Here! Saigon’, ‘Saigon Mad Men’ and ‘Young Saigon’.

Contact us (andy@digipostglobal.com) if you want to produce or collaborate on content for a single video to an entire series!

Check our reel and support our work.

Saigon Mad Men series under the RICE channel!

The latest episode of Saigon Mad Men will be released under the recently launched RICE Channel! We have incredible success with this series and we feel that it should be rewarded with a proper content channel.

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Do subscribe to RICE on YouTube and Facebook!
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqwLPipkZ8xZmq3BojTVQ0A
https://www.facebook.com/ricechanneltv

The new episode will feature the lead vocalist of Black Infinity (metal music band based in Saigon), Hung BlackHearted and his new clothing line, The Black Clothing. This was graded black and white to create an grittiness to the video.

Check out the video!

CREDITS:
Creative Studio & Post Production: Digipost – ‪http://www.digipostglobal.com‬
Production: T-Stop – http://t-stop.vn/
Director: Nick Jones
Camera: Ngo Minh Thanh, Vu Duy Quang
Editor: Nick Jones
Music Supervisor/ Sound Mix: Chris Skipper
Producer: Andy Ho

Fresh Hot Sauce! by Saigon Charlie

Charlie Page was formally an Executive Producer at Group M. Between punching out and punching in the next day, Charlie started making hot sauce. His girlfriend Linh gave him the inspiration and encouragement and his friends supported him.

This clip captures a raw, honest look at what goes into making a bottle of artisan chili sauce made by the combination of Linh and Charlie’s energies.

Featuring Charlie and Chi Loan in the kitchen, and Chi Nhuy at the market.

For more on Saigon Charlie’s sauces, check out his website:
http://saigoncharlie.com

and Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/saigoncharlie?fref=ts

‘Saigon Mad Men’ is a web series on advertising/media personalities in Saigon sharing their passions outside of work.

Check the rest of our series:
vimeo.com/album/3259236

CREDITS:

Creative Studio & Post Production: Digipost – ‪digipostglobal.com‬
Production: 50mm – ‪50mmfilm.com‬
Director: Nick Jones
DOP: Tung Thanh Le
Editor: Nick Jones
Colorist: Alexis Odiowei & Nhan Luong
Sound Designer & Mix: Chris Skipper

Executive Producer: Andy Ho

Special Thanks:
Charlie Page
Chi Loan
Chi Nhuy
P. Weeratip

‘The Bandits’ by Daryl Villanueva

Daryl Villanueva was born in the Philippines, raised in Hong Kong, Australia and Malaysia. His advertising career spans over 10 years with tours in LA, Dubai, Saigon and Beijing.

Besides Bandit9 ( http://www.banditnine.com ), he is also a Partner and Creative Director at The Lab ( http://www.thelabsaigon.com ) that does everything from interior design to industrial design.

‘Saigon Mad Men’ is a web series on advertising/media personalities in Saigon sharing their passions outside of work.

Check the rest of our series:

CREDITS:

Creative Studio: Digipost – http://www.digipostglobal.com

Production: 50mm – http://www.50mmfilm.com
DOP: Tung Thanh Le
Assistant Camera: BlakRay

Post Production: Digipost – http://www.digipostglobal.com
Editor & Director: Nick Jones
Colorist: Alexis Odiowei
Music & Sound Designer: Chris Skipper

Producer: Andy Ho

Special Thanks:
Bandit 9 – http://www.banditnine.com
Acacia Vintage Motorcycles – http://acaciavintagemotorcycles.com/
Blackmagic Design – https://www.blackmagicdesign.com
The Media Village – http://www.mediav.com.sg
The Work Saigon – http://www.worksaigon.com
Dream Catcher Media – http://dcmediavn.com

For more of our works, please check:
http://www.digipostglobal.com