Meet DIGIPOST’s newest colorist

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Please tell me something about you.

My name is Laura F. Knieling. I’m from Spain, where I finished my study in Audiovisual Media. I came to work in Vietnam about one month ago.

Why Vietnam?

I first visited the country on a vacation five years before and loved it so much. So, I decided to come her to start the adventure of working far away from my hometown.

It’s nice to work at DIGIPOST, where people are very open and helpful like a family. I think that homey feeling is very important in such a demanding environment as a post house.

Do you remember the moment you decided to become a colorist?

I always love painting and colors, so when I watch films, I often found myself wondering how that scene could have such a specific look. I was especially intrigued by the cheeky grade of “Drive” by Nicolas Winding Refn, and the elegant, discreet and effective grade of “There Will Be Blood” and “The Master,” both by Paul Thomas Anderson.

I assumed the impressive looks were created by the Director of Photography until one day I realized that they were the creation of colorists. I also realized that I wanted to and could become a colorist.

Is there a gap between your imagination about the job and its reality?

It is more difficult than I thought at the beginning. Once I started doing the job, I realized how many techniques and work are involved. I also realized that there are many ways to do things in color grading. In other words, it is much more complicated, but also more exciting.

It is also different when you are a professional colorist. My first-ever project was a short movie. As a freelancer, I had total control over the work and schedule.

Now, as a professional colorist, I have to meet the expectations of all people involved in my project, including directors and clients. But, it doesn’t mean that it isn’t nice. In fact, it is more challenging and demanding. It helps shape my grading skills and ideas about colors. When people feel happy with the results I deliver, I do too.

I want to keep running and running, improving and improving my skills. I want to make the best.

So, to you, what is color grading and colorist?

As a kid I used to paint, but for different reasons I stopped it and for many years I didn’t took a pencil again. Now, years later I see the color grading as a second opportunity that was given to me to get in touch again with the world of color, accompanying another passion: the audiovisual world.

To me, color grading is a craftsmanship. It’s like molding wax or carving wood. You get the “raw” (in a color meaning) product and you polish it with discretion and care.

You can watch Laura’s showreel here:

It’s time to break that prejudice towards Vietnam post-production

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A screenshot from a TVC completed by DIGIPOST

Director Luong Dinh Dung recently told local media that he sent his highly-anticipated movie “Cha cong con” (Father and Son) to South Korea for post-production. He said most of local directors had their works posted overseas, since post-production technologies in Vietnam are not comparable to other regional countries.

The claim is not new, as similar statements have been reported in local media over the past decade.

But how correct are the claims? Is it true that after more than 10 years, there is not a singular improvement in Vietnam’s post-production technologies at all?

It’s not.

The high-profile movie “Tam Cam: The Untold,” released at the end of August, was praised for its visual effects that were created by Vietnamese artists. Major newspapers such as Thanh Nien and Saigon Giai Phong have reported how Vietnam’s post-production technologies have been on par with regional and even Hollywood standards in recent years.

Vietnam’s young artists even have upped their game and created an animated short film, using the latest 3D Virtual Reality technology.

“These days, how advanced your technologies are no longer matters in post-production,” Andy Ho, executive producer at DIGIPOST, commented on the evolution of post-production. “Anyone who has money to spend on high-end software and other top tools can create standard effects.”

“Post-production is now about professionalism,” he said. “What distinguishes a top post house from average ones is how professional its workflows and personnel are.”

A Ho Chi Minh City-based post house with more than 22 years of experience and a team of international professionals, DIGIPOST, for instance, has provided services for both local and international film studios.

Now, however, due to business reasons, DIGIPOST only makes post-production for feature films selectively, like when its services are meant as a support for young filmmakers, Andy said.

“While feature films demand longer workflows and more complicate technologies, they take post houses longer time to recoup investment, compared to TV commercials,” he said in an explanation why DIGIPOST has focused more on TVCs in recent years.

“When the post-production market grows, DIGIPOST will expand its range. Meanwhile, it will continue to focus on the sector of TVCs where it has proved to be a leader in Vietnam,” Andy said.

DIGIPOST 11th Anniversary – by new Producer Lily Pugh

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11 years of Digipost. Who better to reflect on their company than their newest recruit. As a new producer to the company, joining the team in June, the anniversary was the perfect opportunity for me to see my new colleagues compromised.
Although the evening was my very first Digipost soirre I could tell there were some traditions at work: home cooked grub from ‘The Boss’ Allen Seet, colorful custom cocktails and some ambitious drinking games, for the more self destructive among us(no names mentioned.) It was clear the party itself was a tradition in the industry calendar with anecdotes about the 8th or 9th anniversary or occasionally the  2nd or 3rd  circulating in the room. It was also a great turn out for year 11 with many faces engaged in eager catch ups.
Although I couldn’t participate in the talk of Digipost parties past.  There were plenty of animated discussions about the future and how the industries is changing and growing in different ways. It was great to see the industry out, alive and well. While we celebrate our longevity also celebrate the ongoing future of Digipost- to the next 11 years!
Party Video:
Party Photo Album
Written by Lily Pugh.

The Artist behind ‘Gecko Post – Inside the Post House’ comic series.

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” I’m Que, the concept girl who draws the comic strip: Gecko Post – Inside the Post house. I’m also a designer and creative of Digipost.

The comic was an assignment that my superior gave me when I was still an intern here. I was so excited about it because I love to draw things that had stories and characters.

My first thought is maybe my boss just wanted to test me to decide whether he should offer me a full-time job (and I am a full-time employee now, so congratulations to me haha), but after all, I had a lot of fun doing the comic.

To me, the comic is not a job, I feel very relax when I make it. It is a combination of small and funny stories, they’re all based on true stories (of whom, when and where are confidential haha). At first I often consulted my boss about ideas for stories, and he was willing to share all the interesting stories he saw or heard in the company.

Gradually, I talked more with my colleagues, listened to their stories at lunch or dinner or any relaxing occasion, and they never guessed that even the smallest thing could become inspiration for my comic strips. Of course later they would realize their stories are used, but I’m a good listener (I guess), so they never stop sharing, they like it too.

The one that I made fun of most is probably our Online Artist. When I started designing the characters, there were 2 of them, both were fun men, so I just combined them, and the result is an “Islamic Italian Virgin” character (according to Rahul =]]). And the way he gave me feedback was also so funny, so I made that into my plots too haha (sorry Rahul). He used to asked me: “You made fun of everyone in this company, so who will make fun of you?” And I just said, “I made fun of myself too!” But he didn’t accept that. He said he would draw a “stick figure” comic himself about me. Well, I’’m very much waiting for it :p

‘The Guitar-Maker’s Labor of Love’ by Hubert Leong

This episode in the Saigon Mad Men series features Hubert Leong, who talks about his labor of love making guitars.

Hubert Leong has been an advertising industry veteran for over 30 years. He has worked and lived all over the region and now has given it all up to settle in Vietnam to build guitars.

HL Custom is a custom guitar service based in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam. For more information, please check out his Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/HL-Custom-Guitars/322834917738549?fref=ts

‘Saigon Mad Men’ is a web series on advertising/media personalities in Saigon sharing their passions outside of work.

Check the rest of our series:

CREDITS:

Creative Studio & Post Production: Digipost – http://www.digipostglobal.com
Production: 50mm – http://www.50mmfilm.com
Director: Nick Jones
DOP: Tung Thanh Le
Editor: Alexis Odiowei & Nick Jones
Colorist: Alexis Odiowei
Sound Designer & Mix: Chris Skipper
Music: David Tran & Tuan Anh Bui Huynh

Executive Producer: Andy Ho

Special Thanks:
Hubert Leong – Luthier/Founder HL Custom Guitars
Ngoc Thuc – Master Luthier
Minh – Master Finishing Craftsman
Thang – Master Inlay Artist

‘The Bandits’ by Daryl Villanueva

Daryl Villanueva was born in the Philippines, raised in Hong Kong, Australia and Malaysia. His advertising career spans over 10 years with tours in LA, Dubai, Saigon and Beijing.

Besides Bandit9 ( http://www.banditnine.com ), he is also a Partner and Creative Director at The Lab ( http://www.thelabsaigon.com ) that does everything from interior design to industrial design.

‘Saigon Mad Men’ is a web series on advertising/media personalities in Saigon sharing their passions outside of work.

Check the rest of our series:

CREDITS:

Creative Studio: Digipost – http://www.digipostglobal.com

Production: 50mm – http://www.50mmfilm.com
DOP: Tung Thanh Le
Assistant Camera: BlakRay

Post Production: Digipost – http://www.digipostglobal.com
Editor & Director: Nick Jones
Colorist: Alexis Odiowei
Music & Sound Designer: Chris Skipper

Producer: Andy Ho

Special Thanks:
Bandit 9 – http://www.banditnine.com
Acacia Vintage Motorcycles – http://acaciavintagemotorcycles.com/
Blackmagic Design – https://www.blackmagicdesign.com
The Media Village – http://www.mediav.com.sg
The Work Saigon – http://www.worksaigon.com
Dream Catcher Media – http://dcmediavn.com

For more of our works, please check:
http://www.digipostglobal.com